How Do Cloth Diapers Work

How Do Cloth Diapers Work

How Do Cloth Diapers Work, Anyway?

 

If you don’t have any friends who use cloth diapers, you may never have had the chance to really learn how to do it yourself. Some statistics say that still, 95% of mothers still use disposables rather than cloth. You may be ignorant as to how to actually do it, and that ignorance may be stopping you from looking into it more.

You’re aware that it is better than disposables for the environment. You know it can save you money. You know there are lots of options out there to make it work for you. But, do you know that it’s not as complicated as you think? After all, disposable diapers were introduced in the 40s and were a luxury at that time. Only in the ‘80s did the price go down, and the resulting landfills begin to get filled up. They were a less labor-intensive option, and they meant you didn’t have to deal with poop as much.

The tide is turning, though: interest has increased in learning about the advantages of cloth diapers as opposed to disposables. The following guide will explain how cloth diapers work.
 

Diapering Lingo

 
The first term you need to become familiar with is the prefold.

Prefolds are simply basic cloths that you can use to stuff inside the diaper cover. They come in a variety of fabrics, and are as inexpensive as $1. When you are finished with cloth diapering, they will still be able to be used in the future as potential cleaning cloths or even pet bedding.

Flats, in comparison to prefolds, can be folded to your choice of absorbency (for example, thicker in the front for boys) whereas prefolds are thickest in the middle. These take some extra time to fold. (Speaking of cloth diapering for boys, fun fact: German scientists discovered that the skin temperature of baby boys genitals was higher with disposable diapers, linking a potentially lower sperm count as adult males. One more reason to consider cloth diapering!)

Contour diapers are similar to prefolds except they are tapered in the leg area.

The cloth diaper cover is made of plastic and is intended to contain the damp mess of the prefolds. They usually close with either Velcro or snaps instead of the disposable’s sticky tabs. One of these will run about $8-$12. Interesting fact: these are often made from plastic bottles, and can be recycled when you are done with them! Alternatively, you can use wool or fleece covers. These absorbent, natural, and breathable covers are great for nighttime.

If you want to ensure the prefolds stay in place, you can use stretchy one-piece fasteners called Snappis. Fun fact: this was created by a dad! Gone are the days of safety pins.

At nighttime, you can either double up on prefolds, or use soakers. These are intended for leaks and are simply cloth inserts to last through the night.

Fitted are different than prefolds in that they are molded to the shape of your baby. They are still used with a diaper cover. They have elastic at the legs and therefore can be better at containing messes. This can mean getting your cover dirty less often. It’s a matter of personal preference which one you end up using. These have a large price range, from $11 to $35.

That’s one reason cloth diaper experts recommend getting a variety of options when you’re just starting out to see which style works best for you.

How to change a diaper using prefolds and a diaper cover:

When it is time for a change, you can remove the soiled prefold and replace with a clean one. You can re-use the cover, wiping it off if necessary.

This is the most basic way to cloth diaper, and often the least expensive. But did you know there are options? There is the hybrid diaper, which is named so because it is an easier version of cloth diapering, closer to disposables. You can still use the waterproof outer cover, but then you purchase disposable inserts (100 may only cost $5.) You throw out the disposable inserts and continue to wash the cloth cover, which generates less waste. It is possible to buy biodegradable cloth diaper disposable inserts.

Another option is the All-in-ones. With this kind of cloth diaper, you wash the whole thing every time, the absorbent layer and the outer layer. It requires a bit more laundry but can conveniently be pulled off and tossed into the laundry all in one piece. Because they are convenient, they’re often used when the baby has a caretaker of some kind. The only downside is the expense–one of these can run $15 to $25–and they tend to be bulkier and therefore dry slower than other cloth diaper counterparts.

All-in-twos are like hybrids except the insert is not disposable, and the insert sits next to the baby’s skin.

Pocket diapers are a kind of diaper that has a pocket inside to stuff a reusable insert. This is convenient because you can choose how and how much to stuff the diaper.

One size diapers actually fit your child the entire time you diaper them by adjusting the size through Velcro closures. This is a great way to save money. These are diapers that fit a child from 8 to 35 pounds. The adjustment usually comes at the top along the waistline, and then down the front through a series of snaps. Some of the diapers also allow for adjustment in the leg gussets to help fit your baby better.

The following are suggested cloth diaper accessories:

 
The cloth diaper pail is for storing your diapers apart from the rest of your laundry before washing.

Diaper pail liners are reusable and similar to trash can liners. If you own two, you can wash one with your diaper laundry while the other one is being used.

A waterproof wet bag is for when you’re on the go and you need a place to put used/wet items.

A diaper sprayer is a must if you want to get solid waste off the diaper and into the toilet. You attach it to your toilet. Otherwise, you may need a soak bucket to remove poop.

Flushable liners are one way to avoid having to get solids on the diaper, and instead, are disposed of in the toilet. You do want it to go into the toilet, though. Otherwise, untreated human feces in landfills can endanger our water supply.

Cloth diaper-safe detergent will help your diapers last longer. It will need to avoid containing fabric softeners or oils.

It probably doesn’t surprise you that in addition to cloth diapers there are also cloth wipes. The cost is .90 to $2 per wipe, but you’ll end up saving a lot of money, and they work well, too! And although you can go the store-bought flannel route, it’s certainly possible to use old clothes or terry cloth towels cut into squares. Depending on how crafty you are, you could make a cloth diaper dispenser. In order to moisten the wipes you can buy a solution, or make your own cloth wipe solution using water, baby shampoo, olive oil, and lavender essential oil. Then store it in a spray bottle.
 

Why do people use cloth diapers?

 
With this information, it’s harder to see why everyone doesn’t cloth diaper. First of all, it’s not as hard as it seems once some of the mystery is removed. Second of all, there are options, from hybrid to all-in-ones to one-size diapers, that allow for that easy disposable or convenient element. Third, there is a big initial investment up front, but over time it’s possible to save a lot of money. (If you think about it, using disposable diapers is literally just throwing money away.) Fourth, it is better for the environment. Consider that the average baby uses 8000 disposables. Although chemical detergents also damage the environment, there are ways to save on this, too. One option is drying the diapers out in the sun rather than using a dryer, for example.
 

The best part about cloth diapers?

 
But skipping all of that practical information, there’s one thing that often gets ignored and it is just about the most fun thing about cloth diapering. The designs, styles, and colors! They are all just so dang cute.

Moving on past the definitions and reasons why to cloth diaper, let me explain some other small details that you’re probably wondering about.
 

How often do you change cloth diapers?

 
Disposables can hold more pee. It’s true, you will be changing cloth diapers more often. But consider the diaper rash. That is much rarer with the cloth diapered baby. You can’t use diaper rash creams with cloth diapers, but you won’t need them. You will need to change them at least every two hours, but naturally, every time you know your baby is wet, it’s best to change the diaper to avoid any skin conditions.
 

How do you change a cloth diaper?

 
Shake the diaper insert (and cover, if required) into the diaper pail, when there is only urine. If there was bowel movement, shake what you can into the toilet, or rinse it in there. If you are just breastfeeding, it’s possible to put it directly into the wash without needing a rinse or shake.
 

How much do cloth diapers leak?

 
Cloth diapers can actually leak less than disposables because of the advances in design.
 

Which diapers work best for preemies?

 
You’ll have enough on your plate: an all-in-one will make life easier. Try the Lil Joey All-in-One.
 

Which cloth diapers work best for newborns?

 
Keeping in mind that newborn diapers fit babies up to 14-16 pounds. This means the one-size diapers referenced earlier won’t work for newborns, as they start at 10 pounds (too large for most newborns.) All-in-twos are not the best option for newborns either. The runny poop means that the cover gets dirty too often. An economical option would be the dual size option. This size will fit an infant from six pounds to twenty pounds. When it comes to diaper covers for newborns, look for ones that come with double gussets around the legs to protect from blowouts. Prefolds and fitteds work great with this age. Check out the brand called Workhorses.
 

Which cloth diapers work best for heavy wetters?

 
Cloth diapers made of hemp, bamboo, and cotton are extremely absorbent. You’ll need to ensure a good fit around the waist and legs too. The Grovia O.N.E. comes recommended.
 

Which cloth diapers work best for sensitive skin?

 
Ensure the detergent you’re using is suitable, and then look for natural fabrics like organic cotton, like Smart Bottoms 3.1.
 

Which cloth diapers work best for chunky babies?

 
To make sure the fit is not too tight, (leaving those uncomfortable-looking red marks) look into Blueberry coveralls, one of the larger one-size covers available. You can use them with prefolds, fitted, or flats.
 

Which cloth diaper covers work best for overnights?

 
Wool covers work best because they can absorb up to 30% of their weight and still allow circulation. You can even use them over disposables. One popular brand is the Disana wool overpants.
 

What if I’m too busy?

 
I would say then do it part-time. There are many cloth diapering mamas who use disposables at night or on long trips, for example. Every cloth diaper used is one less disposable in the landfill.

This guide hopefully helped to fill any gaps in your knowledge of how cloth diapers work. The next step is to get out there and try a cloth diapering system for yourself!

 

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How Do Cloth Diapers Work How Do Cloth Diapers Work

Disney Print Cloth Diapers

Unique Disney Print Cloth Diapers

Disney Print Cloth Diapers

 
The wonderful world of Disney is often synonymous with the idea of childhood. Characters like Mickey Mouse, Dumbo, Tigger, and Winnie the Pooh have become staples on a variety of children’s products. From bags to strollers, to blankets, the opportunity to revisit childhood memories heavily influences our choices when it comes to our children. While diapers don’t necessarily appear to be a choice heavily influenced by our own experiences, this is far from true.

The desire to bring out the magic of Disney can easily influence something as simple as diapering – including cloth diapering. Though many people identify cloth diapers with solid colors or boring earth tones, the rise and expansion of personal flair have given birth to a “whole new world” of possibilities.  

Cloth diapers decorated with Disney print tend to stay within a general theme of comfort and ease but can span the spectrum of cloth diapering needs. There is a substantially larger number of selections encompassing all-in-ones, one-size, and swim covers. Regardless of the usage, parents can now incorporate their love of Disney into the world of eco-friendly parenting.

Purchase Options For Disney Print Cloth Diapers

 

Disney Print Cloth Diapers on Etsy

 
When you think of products that are a little more unconventional or unique, such as character-themed cloth diapers, online stores often come to mind. Etsy is by far one of the most well-known sources for one-of-a-kind items. Those looking for that special diaper for their little one, can easily find it within the Etsy stratosphere. Stores such as: Mammacare and SassyCloth have mastered the art of cloth diapering with a Disney twist.

Mamacare:

This particular Etsy store hosts a large variety of cloth diapers in an array of prints. While you can find some more common styles, they also sell multiple Disney print options. Most notable are Toy Story , Mickey Mouse, and Snow White. Not only are they cute to look at, but they’re also reasonably priced.  With prices ranging from $12.95 – $19.95, depending on the print and free shipping for orders over $35, it is easy to understand their high favorability rating.
 
Disney Print Cloth Diapers Toy Story 

SassyCloth:

Another fantastic Etsy option can be found in SassyCloth. Specializing in handmade cloth diapers with multiple print options, they go beyond the norm. Offering the option for custom design cloth diapers, SassyCloth brings the ultimate combination of cute, functional, eco-friendly, and uniqueness. Also reasonably priced within a range of $10.95 – $17.95, they are a fantastic choice for those who want to get their Disney fix while making sure their little one is completely comfortable.
 
Disney Cloth Diapers Etsy
 

Disney Print Cloth Diapers at Amazon

 
Not to be outdone, Amazon also has multiple options for those who desire both fun and whimsy for their cloth diapering choices. Though pricing can vary and searching can be time-consuming, Amazon sellers can often provide an economically sound option for those who want some unique inspiration. Here are just a few:

  • Mickey Mouse Cloth Diaper (minky) by KerrBearKids.com
  • Disney Baby Cinderella Princess Diaper Cover & Headwrapset Sz 0-12m by Disney Baby
  • Disney Minnie Mouse Set of 3 Nappy Cotton Fabric Flannel Baby Diaper Muslin by YNC
  • Bumkins Disney Minnie Mouse Waterproof Wet Bag by Bumkins

 

Trading & Swapping

 
With most families living on a budget, a primary concern that many parents have is the cost for diapers. While disposable diapers often have the allure of a lower-price, cloth diapers often have a bad reputation for being “overly-priced” If you’re looking for an eco-friendly option, that also allows you to cloth diaper, local thrift stores can often be a good place to start. 

I’m sure some may be wondering, “Why would I purchase an already used diaper?”. Though this would be a valid concern with a disposable diaper, cloth diapering allows for multiple uses and longevity to take center stage. Rather than spending $19.95 on an All in One, someone just getting started can purchase a gently used cloth diaper for as little as $2.00 which will allow for a variety of patterns and styles while also staying within one’s financial means.
 

eBay Has Disney Print Cloth Diapers!

 
When the topic of gently used items comes up, it is almost impossible to overlook the dynamic reach of EBay. eBay offers an opportunity to search for hard to find items worldwide. In terms of cloth diapers, EBay functions as a figurative gold-mine for those who want to step into the world of eco-friendly diapering for an affordable cost. While it may be a bit more difficult to find Disney print diapers through other avenues, EBay makes it easy, seamless, and affordable. With options as low as $9.95, parents can stock their closets with a variety of Disney characters for any occasion
 

Make Them Yourself

 
For those who crave a more adventurous avenue and, want to possibly learn a new hobby, there is always the choice to make these adorable diapers yourself. Though this may seem intimidating at first, the choice to go homemade can not only be economically wise but also a way to create something new and unique.

As with many first-time projects, YouTube tutorials are often popular, but some of the most helpful tips can come from other parents familiar with cloth diapering. With a yard of fabric, the right pattern, elastic, and Velcro, parents can make their own cloth diapers for approximately $5 per diaper. It is often best to source materials from craft and fabric stores that you trust. For sewing novices, it may be best to look for a sewing class to get you started before you dive into more specialized projects. Though pricing depends on the type of cloth diaper involved, you’ll be able to stick with Disney themes and diaper styles that you prefer.

Regardless of which direction you choose to take, cloth diapers have moved far past the basic color palette often conjured in the minds f the general public. Though disposable diapers often appear more appealing at first glance for their child-friendly themes and familiar characters, cloth diapers now offer even better opportunities. Disney characters are admired and loved for their unique and personal touch. This same personal touch can be found in the practice of cloth diapering. From all-in-ones to fitted, and swim diapers, make Disney a part of your eco-friendly journey. Your child deserves it and so do you.

Disney Print Cloth Diapers P

bumGenius All-In-One ~ The Four Major Styles

Bumgenius All In One Cloth Diaper

bumGenius All-In-One

BumGenius is a company that was created by a family who knew the very definition of financial struggles. Jenn Labit started in 2005, making microfiber inserts and from there advanced to the “All-In-One Cloth Diapers.” Now BumGenius offers a variety of cloth diapers along with plenty of helpful accessories. The “All-In-One Cloth Diapers” offer four different diapers which consist of Freetime, Elemental, Littles 1.0 Newborn, and Littles 2.0 Newborn.

Buying these cloth diapers straight from the bumGenius Amazon store https://amzn.to/31SQT8O saves a good amount of money versus buying them off other sites. BumGenuis offers packs at a discounted rate and some fantastic accessories that will make your cloth diapering experience that much better. You’ll also get the latest updated diapers and can view many of their other products.

Bumgenius Freetime All In One Cloth Diaper

bumGenius Freetime

The bumGenius Freetime All-In-One-Size Cloth Diaper fits approximately 8lb-35lbs+ and has a 3×3 snap elastic snap system that makes adjusting the diaper to the most comfortable fit easier. It is also a diaper that has adjustable absorbency with stay dry inserts. The outer layer of the diaper is waterproof to avoid leaks. BumGenius also offers thirty-one different colors and patterns to choose from for a more customizable experience. These diapers are great for first-time cloth diaper users, being that there is no stuffing meaning the guesswork is left out.

The cleaning process consists of pre-wash in cold water, wash in hot water with bumGenius detergent, extra rinse, and then hang dry. Once a month they need to be washed in ¼ cup of water of bleach and hot water. Compared to other cloth diapers, these all-in-ones are much easier to wash.

There is no taking apart, unstuffing, simply dump your wet bag in the washer and go. If you are trying to transition from disposable diapers to clothes one slowly, these are the way to go! They are great over-night diapers and do live up to their no-leak build. The durability of these diapers is phenomenal, too, making them worth every penny. Be careful when using butt paste though, as it will stain and is very difficult to get out.

Bumgenius Elemental

bumGenius Elemental

The bumGenius Elemental One-Size Cloth Diapers are made from 100% organic cotton. They provide you with twenty-seven options for color and designs. An adjustable absorbency is also an option with these diapers. Tuck extra additional inserts under the liner, and you are set to go. Same as the Freetime diaper, these also have a 3×3 snap system, waterproof outer layer, and fit sizes approximately 8lbs-35lbs+.

Being that these are 100% organic, washing these diapers are a bit different than what others are. Before the first use separate the dark diapers from the lighter ones and wash in hot water. After you start using these diapers, make sure that for the first six washes you keep the darks and lights separate as well.

Do the usual pre-wash in cold water then wash in hot with an extra rinse and only unscented detergent, no fabric softener. Once a month wash with ¼ cup of bleach in hot water. Hang dry after every wash. Storing dirty diapers is a bit different. Instead of using a wet bag, use a dry bag. They do take longer to dry and are less absorbent than the Freetime diaper.

Bumgenuis Littles 1 0

bumGenuis Littles 1.0

BumGenius also offers a couple of options for newborns. One of them is the bumGenuis Littles 1.0-Newborn Cloth Diaper. This diaper fits babies 12lbs and under and provides an exceptional fit that sits below the belly button to keep the umbilical area dry. It is available in twenty-one colors and designs.

Instead of having the 3×3 snapping system, these diapers have the hook and loop closure with stretchy tabs for a custom fit. They also have the waterproof outer layer to help protect from leaking, easily replaceable elastic and a snug fit. The microfiber material inside helps wick the moisture away from your baby’s skin, keeping them dry. A common problem with these diapers is before the baby physically outgrows them, the diaper can’t keep up with the amount of moisture needing to be absorbed. Adding extra padding to these diapers is very difficult as they are a trim fit.

Bumgenuis Littles 2 0

bumGenuis Littles 2.0

The other newborn diaper is the bumGenius Littles 2.0-Newborn Cloth Diaper. They are a more improved version of the previous 1.0 release. These diapers have lowered their umbilical cord cut dip and also provides a bonus doubler to increase absorbency. Instead of having the hook and loop system, the improved newborn diapers provide the snap system.

Sizing is about the same – babies between 6lbs and 12lbs even though it seems most babies outgrow them before reaching the 12lb mark. They are known to leak ask well though, even with their waterproof outside layer and extra doubler. Just like the other bumGenius diapers, they have a variety of colors and designs.

Bumgenius Freetime vs Elemental

Overall it seems that the preferred bumGenuis All-In-One Cloth Diaper is the Freetime All-In-One Cloth Diaper. It would be more cost-effective to skip the Newborn diaper and go with either Freetime or Essentials. They are the perfect size for a majority of babies and seem to offer the most efficient leak protection.

The only real differences between the Freetime All-In-One Cloth Diapers and the Essential All-In-One Cloth Diapers are that the Essentials are 100% organic and have slightly different care and wash instructions. They all take a significant amount of time to air dry, but that is something that comes with using cloth diapers in general. Something special that bumGenius offers are their diapers was designed by an actual mother who uses her own product. She has first-hand knowledge of the pros and cons and can adjust accordingly. For example, the Newborn 1.0 and 2.0 show how she made slight adjustments to increase the comfort and functionality of the diaper.

bumGenius All In One Size Chart

 

 
Product Weight More Info

bumGenius Freetime

Fits 8lb – 35lbs+

bumGenius Elemental

Fits 8lbs – 35lbs+

bumGenuis Littles 1.0

Fits 12lbs and under

bumGenuis Littles 2.0

Fits 6 – 12 lbs

 

Final Thoughts On The bumGenius All In One

Compared to other brands, bumGenius is the way to go if you are looking for quality at a great price. Numerous reviews I have read say that these customers can use these same diapers from the first child they have to the second and so on. Being all-in-one makes these diapers about as easy to use as disposable diapers and in the long haul will save you a significant amount of money.

Buying these cloth diapers straight from their Amazon store (https://amzn.to/31SQT8O) also saves a good amount of money versus buying them off other sites. BumGenuis offers packs at a discounted rate and some fantastic accessories that will make your cloth diapering experience that much better. You’ll also get the latest updated diapers and can view many of their other products.

Credits: BumGenius.com

Bumgenius All In One

How Often Do You Wash Cloth Diapers?

How Often Do You Wash Cloth Diapers

 

How Often Do You Wash Cloth Diapers?

 
One of the very first decisions new parents must make when they are gifted with a baby is the diaper situation. What brand of diapers to get, how many should you start with, and what type you should go with? Not many know this, but they still have places where you can buy cloth diapers, and disposable isn’t the only choice available.

The first instinct is to go for the disposable diapers; you assume they are easier to deal with, the baby has an accident, and you just throw them away once you are finished changing them. Before you know it, you have thrown away ten diapers in one day, and one of those was soiled immediately after putting it on the baby. What a waste. Those new parents do not realize all of the money they are wasting when they can be saving it with cloth diapers.

Now, the first question about cloth diapers is what maintenance is included in keeping the cloth diapers clean and ready-to-use when needed. How clean the cloth diapers are and what work goes into maintaining them is different for every parent, but some general washing guidelines should be followed if you’re trying to figure out if cloth diapers are right for your family.
 

How Often Do You Wash Cloth Diapers That Are Heavily Soiled?

 
The number of times you should wash cloth diapers will vary 1 – 3 days, depending on the state of the soiled diaper. If the baby had a big accident in the diaper, it should probably not be left to sit for 2 or 3 days, but be washed within that one day window. Then you would want to wait before that diaper again because you don’t want to re-use the diaper too soon and then have to rewash it within the same week.
 

How Often Do You Wash Cloth Diapers That Are Mildly Soiled?

 
On the other hand, if the cloth diaper is mildly soiled and doesn’t require too much attention, you can wait a couple of days to wash it, but you should not wait any longer than three days because then you are not only risking irreversible staining but also the chance of bacteria forming increases.
 

Bacteria On Cloth Diapers

 
Bacteria is a real threat and is something that you want to keep an eye on with anything that may come in contact with your baby. The best way to prevent bacteria is not to let a soiled diaper, no matter whether it’s due to a big or small accident, you do not want to leave the diaper in a dark, confined space. This allows bacteria to form. If you do not want to wash the cloth diaper right away then that’s perfectly fine, just make sure that the diaper is left somewhere with proper air circulation during the time between wash cycles.
 

Stains On Cloth Diapers

 
Washing more often does not decrease the likelihood of staining. If you do not want the diaper to be left with a stain, which no one wants, a neat trick is to leave the diaper in the sun. Like it does with hair, the sun is a natural bleacher since cloth diapers are white, then that means they will not lose their original color and makes this method color-safe. This avenue also helps parents to avoid using unsafe chemicals like bleach to return the white color to your diaper.
 
How Often Do You Wash Cloth Diapers Stains On Cloth Diapers
 

What About Changing A Non-Soiled Cloth Diaper At Bath Time?

 
Now, if the baby did not have an accident in the diaper and you are doing a changing because you just bathed the baby, or if you have changed the baby’s outer clothes and decided to change the diaper too, then you can wait a little longer to wash the cloth diaper.
 

The More You Wash, The Shorter The Cloth Diapers Lifespan!

 
When it comes to cleaning a cloth diaper, you want to try to keep the washing to a minimum. Like many clothes, the more it is washed, the shorter the lifespan. This doesn’t mean you should skip the washing schedule to get the cloth diaper to last longer, but you do not want to wash the diapers more often than they need to be washed.
 

Smelly Cloth Diapers

 
You don’t want to wait too long between days to clean the cloth diaper, because not only do you have to worry about staining, but also smell. The longer the diaper stays soiled, the worse the smell and harder it is to get it out. If your cloth diapers start to exhibit an aroma that is beyond the typical odor of a soiled diaper, it is time for a wash. This is left to your discretion, no matter when you last washed the diaper.
 

Cloth Diaper Manufacturer Washing Instructions

 
The one set of instructions that should be strictly followed are the ones laid out by the manufacturers. They know their products more than anyone else, so it’s best to always read the manufacturer’s care instructions and follow them to the best of your abilities. If they say to wash the diapers every other day, then that’s what you do.
 

Final Thoughts

 
Cloth diapers are great to have for new parents, especially if money is tight, but you have to take care of them.

They should be washed often enough to keep them free of bacteria, stains, and odor, but also not so much that you wear the diapers out before you get your money’s worth out of them. Cloth diapers are not something you can neglect without facing the consequences of making them unusable.

At the end of the day, it comes down to being a judgment call. You have to be able to see and smell a cloth diaper and be able to decide whether or not it needs to be washed, regardless of the last time that it was done. If you just washed it a couple of days ago and it is stained and smelly then rewash it before using it.

When it’s something that deals with your baby, corners should never be cut because it is not worth dealing with the aftermath. If you can’t decide whether or not wash the diaper, then wash it. It is better to wash it more often than not often enough.

Works Cited

GroVia. “Top 6 Laundry Mistakes.” GroVia,
www.grovia.com/pages/grovia_cd_basics_laundry_mistakes.

“Washing Cloth Diapers.” Nicki’s Diapers,
www.nickisdiapers.com/washing-cloth-diapers.html

Photo Credits,
Pixabay

How Often Do You Wash Cloth Diapers

Choosing the Right Laundry Detergent for Cloth Diapering

Woman Choosing the Right Laundry Detergent for Cloth Diapering

Laundering cloth diapers is actually incredibly straightforward once you’ve got your system down. Choosing the right detergent for your diapers is not as difficult as it sounds, either! The main factors to take into consideration are:

  • Cost
  • Effectiveness
  • Environmental Impact
  • Ease of Use

 

Cost

 
Detergents come at a number of different price points – but most are within a few dollars of each competing brand. If you’re at a place where cost really is the most important factor, the following strategies are recommended:

 

Buying in bulk

 

Co-op and bulk-bin stores will let you purchase detergents by the ounce in your own refillable container. Just weigh your clean, empty container, and then fill up with as much or as little as you want to bring home. Because you can measure exactly how much you’re buying, you can make sure you stay exactly within your budget. Bonus – the cost per ounce is usually lower than buying typically packaged detergents, as you’re not paying for the bottle or the increased cost to transport the packaging.

 

Buying powdered detergent

 

Powdered detergent used to be the gold standard in home laundering. With the advent of high-efficiency machines, and ease of dispensing into small receptacles in the machines came liquid detergent as we know it today. While powder is typically a lower-cost option, with so many liquid detergents available, some powdered detergents are becoming increasingly difficult to find in stores.

 

Making your own

 

Making your own detergent can be highly economical as the ingredients themselves are fairly inexpensive. I wouldn’t use homemade laundry soap on my cloth diapers, so I can’t recommend it for my readers. I wrote about why I don’t use homemade Laundry Detergent for my cloth diapers .

However for those of you still interested, you usually have to buy a large container, but that container will last you ages. If you have access to a bulk bins store, you may be able to purchase smaller quantities to make a smaller batch. You can also customize it to meet exactly your family’s needs, especially important If you’ve got an allergy or sensitivity. The Eco-Friendly Family has a fantastic DIY Recipe if you want to try it out. (1)

 

Effectiveness

 
Whichever detergent you get should ultimately have the same end result – clean, sanitary diapers! If that’s not happening, then it doesn’t matter which of the other categories it satisfies. To ensure you’re giving your detergents the most optimal conditions to work its magic, make sure you’re washing them properly. See our article Cloth Diaper Washing Instructions ~ That Work

If diapers aren’t getting as clean as you’d expect, or they aren’t as clean as they used to be, you can troubleshoot before switching detergents.

  • Check that diapers aren’t holding onto excess detergent residue. Even with proper cleaning, diapers can hold onto residue from detergents, reducing their absorbency, and ultimately looking and feeling less “clean”. You can find out more about how to strip the residue from your diapers here.
  • Make sure your washing machine isn’t overdue for a deep cleaning. All washing machines are prone to needing a deep cleaning every now and then. To help get a cleaner clean on all your loads, check out how to effectively clean your washer.

 

Environmental Impact

 

 

Ease of Use

 

Like many aspects of 21st-century living, convenience has trumped environmental impact when products are marketed to consumers. Being a savvy consumer though, you can learn where these “convenience” items are actually traps and where you can both save money, and reduce your environmental impact by choosing the most eco-friendly options.

 

Packaging

 

Increased packaging under the guise of convenience has been at play for decades now. Smaller package sizes, multiple layers of plastic packaging bags, wrappers and such all increase the amount of waste that consumers must go through before even getting to their product. By opting for packages with as little extra waste as possible, you are able to help your home and the planet at the same time! Look for individual items that don’t have extra “wrapping” around them, and avoid sample sizes or multipacks and opt for larger containers, where possible.

 

Pod Detergents

 
Laundry Pods
Pod detergents have become increasingly popular due to their easy portioning and dispensing. They don’t come without their own set of concerns, however. The containers that they come in are almost exclusively plastic, and while many can be recycled, unfortunately, it is estimated that less than 10% of plastic that is sorted for recycling is never actually recycled. (2)

If you do prefer pods, opting for cardboard packaging (3) or reusing plastic packaging around the house first would help extend the life of this otherwise single-use container.
 

Reusable dispensers

 

Hands down, the best way to eliminate waste when purchasing laundry detergent, is to eliminate single-use packaging altogether. You can do this by making your own detergent and storing it in your own containers, or by purchasing pre-made detergent in bulk at co-ops or other stores that offer bulk items for purchase. If you don’t have access to any locally, you can also purchase refills for dispensers you already own. Brands like Method (4) and Grove Collaborative (5) both offer refill packs for your liquid detergent. Just keep in mind that with both of these options, you’re still receiving the detergent in a plastic bladder bag, although single-use, it is far less plastic than buying an entirely new dispenser bottle each time.

 

Ease of Use

 
Another very legitimate consideration when determining what laundry detergent you’re going to use is how difficult it will be for you to use it. Suggesting that everyone simply choose the detergent that had the highest marks in each category and leave it at that would be incredibly short-sighted, as we know each option is not feasible for every family.

Whether you don’t have access to low-cost ingredients, you don’t have the space to store large quantities, or you don’t have the funds for the up-front cost of larger sizes or reusable containers, it is understandable that how the detergent gets used is one of the factors in which is right for you as well.

We hope this guide was helpful and gave you many factors to consider when choosing how you will launder your cloth diapers. When you’re ready to start discovering brands that are specific to your needs and preferences, we have a few resources that you can use to help guide you right here on YourClothDiaper.com. Simply use our search function to find what you’re looking for! Can’t find the information you need? Head on over to our Facebook Page and send me a message detailing your concerns or questions and I will help you the best I can!!

Resources/Products:
1. https://theecofriendlyfamily.com/cloth-diaper-detergent/
2. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2017/07/plastic-produced-recycling-waste-ocean-trash-debris-environment/
3. https://www.dropps.com/
4. https://amzn.to/2TkpjhK
5. https://www.grove.co/catalog/product/Ultra-concentrated-liquid-laundry-detergent/?v=3603&attrsrc=22&attrpg=catalog&attrpos=4
9. https://clothdiapertales.com/category/washing-cloth-diapers/
Photo Credit: Pixabay

Diaper Rash Cream For Cloth Diapers Index – All You’ll Ever Need To Know!

Diaper Rash Cream For Cloth Diapers Index

In a hurry?
Soothing Diaper Rash Cream by Aleva Naturals is my number one pick and will probably be a great fit for your needs. Use the link below to order the product on Amazon. – Soothing Diaper Rash Cream by Aleva Naturals

 

Not all diapers are created equal.

Not all diaper rash creams are created equal either.

Now that you’ve decided on cloth diapers, there are some guidelines you need to keep in mind regarding diaper rash cream. You can’t use just any old diaper cream. You need to take into consideration if it will wash out, leave stains, or completely ruin your cloth diaper.

Cloth diapers are made of various types of material:

  • Natural Fiber, e.g., Cotton, Hemp or Bamboo Velour
  • Microfleece
  • Charcoal
  • “Stay-Dry”

Each of these kinds of material has different ways they react to the ingredients in diaper rash creams. We will be going over these.
 

I Use Cloth Diapers. What Do I Need to Watch For?

 

For cloth diapers, you need to watch for a few different ingredients. Some can stain, or cause repelling issues.
 

Ingredients that can cause issues

 

  • Zinc Oxide – It stains (white/grey spot), but it can be washed out with careful washing. and treating. Overuse of this ointment will cause the absorbency of your diaper to reduce.
  • Lanolin – It will wash out (it is used to “waterproof” wool covers).
  • Petroleum – This is a bad one; it causes repelling issues when using synthetic fibers.

If you do decide to use petroleum, use a liner in your cloth diaper to help prevent staining. Make sure it is thin and disposable or reusable (microfleece, flannel, cotton, etc.). Check to see it works with the cloth diaper too.

The reusable liners can be washed with your cloth diapers on HOT water, as this will prevent the transfer of oils from the liner to the cloth diaper. Extra hard to get out stains can be treated with a toothbrush and dish soap after your first cycle of washing. VIVA paper towels are a great and cheap alternative to fabric liners.

Cotton, hemp or bamboo velour won’t require a liner for the use of petroleum-based diaper rash cream, as long as you have a proper washing routine in place. When using fleece/charcoal or stay-dry, watch for creams with candelilla wax, microcrystalline wax, panthenol or sesame seed oil. All of those products will reduce the absorbency of your cloth diaper and cause repelling.

On fluffloveuniversity.com, they advise:

“Those who have a solid wash routine with proper detergent, friction, and the water level may find that they can use any cream, even petroleum-based, on all of their diapers (synthetic or not) without a liner, and not have any issues. If you think that you may be able to use these creams, TEST them first on a diaper prior to using it freely without a liner. That way, if you find you do have buildup or repelling, you can easily spot-treat the area without much effort.”

Alright, now that we got that out of the way, let’s talk about some diaper creams on the market. There are umpteen million baby diaper rash creams available. A lot are geared toward the disposable diaper market. You only need to look at the ingredients to see if it is safe for your cloth diapers.
Only a few will be listed. If the list contained every single one of the diaper rash creams that are safe to use with cloth diapers, we’d be here all day perusing the list.
 

Diaper Rash Cream For Cloth Diapers

 
Petroleum-based ointments will affect the absorbency of your diapers, which will cause leakage. I use petroluem-based oitnments, with a liner, and have zero problems with my cloth diapers!
 

 
Summary More Info

A&D Original Ointment

Pediatrician recommended; great reviews online

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? Cod liver oil, mineral oil
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes

Ad Original Diaper Ointment 4 Ounce

A&D Zinc Oxide Cream

Also contains Aloe.

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Cod liver oil, coconut oil, light mineral oil
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no

A D Diaper Rash Cream Zinc Oxide

Aden & Anais Mum & Bub Soothing Ointment

Naturally derived ingredients.

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Vegetable oil, canola oil
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no (Benzyl Alcohol)

Bn Aden Anais Mum Bub Soothing Ointment 3oz

Aleva Naturals Soothing Diaper Cream

Hypoallergenic, Certified Vegan and cruelty-free.

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Castor seed oil, Olive Fruit Oil, Roman Chamomile Flower oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: some ingredients, but not all
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes

Aleva Naturals Soothing Diaper Cream

Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment

Pediatrician recommended

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? mineral oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment

Arbonne Baby Care Diaper Rash Cream

Certified vegan and gluten-free

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? sunflower seed oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Arbonne Baby Care Diaper Rash Cream

Avalon Organics Protective Ointment (DISCONTINUED!)

Hypo-allergenic; vegetarian ingredients

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? Castor seed oil, Coconut oil, lanolin oil, jojoba seed oil, safflower seed oil, sunflower seed oil
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Avalon Organics Protective Ointment

Aveeno Soothing Relief Diaper Rash Cream w/ zinc oxide

Made with Oat and Aloe

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? no
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Aveeno Soothing Relief Diaper Rash Cream W Zinc Oxide

Babo Botanicals Soothing Diaper Cream

Certified B Corporation; cruelty-free; gluten free

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? sunflower seed oil, castor seed oil, babassu seed oil, oat kernel oil, Extra virgin olive oil, safflower seed oil
  • Fragrance-free: no (contains natural fragrance)
  • Organic: some ingredients
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Babo Botanicals Soothing Diaper Cream

Baby Bottom Better Diaper Salve

Only three natural ingredients – plantain, chickweed and calendula

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? no
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Baby Bottom Better Diaper Salve

Baby and Eve everyday bum balm

Not tested on animals, chemical free product

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Olive oil, Immortelle oil, calendula oil, Chamomile oil, almond oil, avocado oil, lavender oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Balm Bum

Babyganics Non-Petroleum Soothing Protective Ointment

Made in the US, never tested on animals

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Castor seed oil, hydrogenated castor oil, coconut oil, jojoba seed oil, tomato seed oil, cranberry seed oil, sunflower seed oil, black cumin seed oil, red raspberry seed oil, soybean oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: some ingredients
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Babyganics non Petroleum Soothing Protective Ointment

Balm Baby Mad Rash

All natural, vegan, plastic-free packaging

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Olive oil, coconut oil, macadamia nut oil, kukui nut oil, sesame seed oil, neem oil, orange, lavender and tea tree essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Balm Baby Mad Rash

Balm! Baby Diaper Balm

Vegan, plastic free, made in the USA

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Extra Virgin Olive oil, coconut oil, macadamia nut oil, lavender, orange, and tea tree oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Balm Baby Diaper Balm

Balmex Diaper Rash Ointment

Also has Aloe Vera

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Mineral oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Balmex Diaper Rash Ointment

Bee All Natural Diaper Rash Salve

Chemical free

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? sunflower seed oil, jojoba oil, coconut oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Bee All Natural Diaper Rash Salve

Bee Green Naturals CocoBum Cream

Oils and herb ingredients only

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Olive oil, Coconut oil, macadamia oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Beegreennaturals

Bourdeaux’s All Natural Butt Paste (green tube)

Some all natural ingredients

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? hydrogenated castor oil, castor seed oil, balsam Peru oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Boudreauxs All Natural Butt Paste 4 Oz 2

Burt’s Bees Baby Bee Ointment

100% natural

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Castor seed oil, Olive oil, almond oil, jojoba seed oil, hydrogenated castor oil, soybean oil, canola oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Burt’s Bees Baby Bee Ointment

CJ’s BUTTer Shea Butter Balm

Gluten free, all natural product.

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut oil, Olive oil, sesame seed oil, neem seed oil
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

California Baby Diaper Rash Cream

Cruelty-free; allergy and gluten-free

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut Oil, lavender oil, tea tree oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
California Baby Diaper Rash Cream

Calmoseptine

Anti-itch

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? none
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Calmoseptine

Chamomile ChubStick with Zinc

Comes in a roll-on stick

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut Oil, lavender oil, Chamomile essential oil, seabuckthorn oil, olive oil, jojoba oil, castor oil, argan oil
  • Fragrance-free: no (natural fragrance)
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Cortizone-10

Healing Aloe

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: yes
  • Oils? Which ones? mineral oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Cortizone 10 Plus Maximum Strength Anti Itch

Desitin Ointment

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: yes
  • Oils? Which ones? Cod liver oil
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no

Desitin Ointment

Earth Mama Angel Baby Bottom Balm

Non-GMO

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Olive oil, jojoba seed oil, lavender oil, tea tree oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Earth Mama Angel Baby Bottom Balm

Earthly Remedies Baby’s Butt Cream

All-natural

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut Oil, sunflower oil, meadowfoam oil, lavender, tea tree, and clove essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Eco Sprout Bottom Balm

Roll on stick

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Shea oil, almond oil, calendula infused olive oil, essential oils (non-specific)
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Eco Sprout Bottom Balm+

Roll on stick; Same as the Bottom Balm

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Shea oil, almond oil, calendula infused olive oil, essential oils (non-specific)
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Eco Sprout Coconut Stick

Only three ingredients; roll on stick

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut Oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Euphoric Herbals Baby Balm

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut Oil, olive oil, lavender, tea tree, and orange essential oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes

Euphoric Herbals Baby Balm

Grandma El’s Diaper Rash Remedy and Prevention

Made in the USA

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? none
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Grandma Els Diaper Rash Remedy And Prevention Baby

GroVia Magic Stick Diaper Balm

Roll on stick; safe for cloth diapers

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? grapeseed oil, lavender oil, jojoba oil, rose oil, meadowfoam seed oil, olive oil, tea tree old, chamomile oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Grovia Magic Stick Z Diaper Balm 75 Oz

GroVia Magic Stick Z

Stick, made in the US, no animal testing

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? grapeseed oil, lavender essential oil, jojoba oil, rose hip oil, meadowfoam seed oil, olive oil, tea tree oil, chamomile essential oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Noimageavailable 1

Growing Up Herbal

Vegan

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Extra virgin olive oil, pure essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Growing Up Herbal 1

Honest Company Diaper Rash Cream

NSF certified.

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut Oil, castor seed oil, olive oil, grape seed oil, jojoba oil, sunflower seed oil,
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
The Honest Company Honest Diaper Rash Cream 25

Honest Company Organic Healing Balm

Non-GMO, not tested on animals

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? sunflower seed oil, olive oil, coconut oil, tamanu oil, chamomile oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Honest Company Organic Healing Balm

Honest Company Rapid Relief Diaper Rash Cream

NSF certified

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut Oil, castor seed oil, olive oil, grape seed oil, jojoba oil, sunflower seed oil,
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
The Honest Company Honest Diaper Rash Cream Rapid Relief

La Petite Creme Diaper Cleanser Lotion

Hypoallergenic, no animal testing.

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? olive oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Lanolin nipple cream

Made in the USA; one ingredient

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? none
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Lansinoh Hpa Lanolin

Lansinoh Diaper Rash Ointment

Hypoallergenic

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? none
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Noimageavailable 1

LuSa Organics Booty Balm

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? olive oil, jojoba oil, avocado oil, lavender, patchouli, and chamomile essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes

Lusa Organics Booty Balm Grande

LuSa Organics Naked Booty Balm

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? olive oil, jojoba oil, avocado oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes

Noimageavailable 1

Maty’s All Natural Baby Ointment

Gluten free, no animal testing

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? olive, castor, coconut, jojoba
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Matys All Natural Baby Chest Rub 150oz Each

MotherLove Diaper Rash and Thrush Ointment

Named changed to Diaper Balm (same formula)

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Extra virgin olive oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: some ingredients
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

NYME Organics Bun Glaze

Plant-based ingredients, not tested on animals

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? extra virgin olive oil, sunflower oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Neosporin

Not designed specifically for diaper rash

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? cottonseed oil, olive oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
3 Pack Neosporin Original First Aid Antibiotic

Northern Essence All Natural Diaper Rash Salves

Comes in tub or twist up tube

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? calendula infused oil, meadowfoam oil, essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Ora’s Amazing Herbal Baby Salve

Herbs are organic, some ingredients are non-GMO

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? castor oil, coconut oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Oras Amazing Herbal Baby Salve

Organic unrefined virgin coconut oil

Can be used for many ailments

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? Coconut oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Simply Nature Usda Organic Coconut Oil Unrefined Cold

Peas in a Pod Baby’s Bum Balm

Some organic ingredients

    • Zinc Oxide: no
    • Lanolin: no
    • Petroleum: no
    • Oils? Which ones? olive oil, almond oil, apricot kernel oil, jojoba oil, lavender oil
    • Fragrance-free: yes
    • Organic: no
    • Dye-Free: yes
    • Preservative-free: yes
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Pooters Skin Therapy

Safe for cloth diapers, made in the US

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? coconut oil, olive oil, almond oil, grape seed oil, vitamin E oil, lavender, chamomile and tea tree essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Reese and Luke’s Shea Butter Baby Balm

Fair Trade

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? olive oil, jojoba oil, pure essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
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Shea Moisture Raw Shea Chamomile and Argan Oil Baby Head-to-Toe Ointment

Cruelty-free, B corporation, fair trade ingredients

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? vegetable oil, olive oil, safflower seed oil, coconut oil, castor oil, jojoba oil, avocado oil, evening primrose oil, essential oils
  • Fragrance-free: no
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Shea Moisture Raw Shea Chamomile Argan Oil

Thirsties Booty Love

Cloth diaper safe, animal testing free

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? extra virgin olive oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: yes
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

Vaseline (petroleum jelly)

Not designed specifically for diaper rash

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: Yes
  • Oils? Which ones? none
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Vaseline Petroleum Jelly Original

Weleda Calendula Diaper Rash Cream

Certified natural, No animal testing

  • Zinc Oxide: yes
  • Lanolin: yes
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? almond oil, sesame seed oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: no
Weleda Calendula Baby Diaper Rash Cream

Wish Garden Herbs Baby Bum Balm

Gluten-free, Non-GMO

  • Zinc Oxide: no
  • Lanolin: no
  • Petroleum: no
  • Oils? Which ones? vitamin E oil, olive oil, coconut oil
  • Fragrance-free: yes
  • Organic: no
  • Dye-Free: yes
  • Preservative-free: yes
Noimageavailable 1

 
 
And now here is a list of the not so safe creams for your cloth diapers. Remember, if you chose to go this route, a liner is needed. I prefer Bummis Bio-Soft, but you can use whatever liner suits your needs. Petroleum-based ointments will affect the absorbency of your diapers, which will cause leakage. Nobody, or should I say no baby wants that.
 

Diaper Rash Creams That Are Potentially Problematic (Petroleum Based)

 

  • A&D Original Ointment
  • Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment
  • Avalon Organics Protective Ointment (DISCONTINUED!)
  • Cortizone-10
  • Desitin Ointment
  • Grandma El’s Diaper Rash Remedy and Prevention
  • Lansinoh Diaper Rash Ointment
  • Neosporin
  • Shea Moisture Raw Shea Chamomile and Argan Oil Baby Head-to-Toe Ointment
  • Vaseline (petroleum jelly)

 

Save Your Baby’s Bottom

 

To wrap this all up, here are the key takeaways: natural fiber diapers are fine to use with any type of diaper rash cream, so long as you have a good washing routine down. As for synthetic fibers, like microfiber or stay-dry, you’ll need to stay away from petroleum-based or mineral oil-based creams. If you do go that route anyway, use a liner with each diaper.

It’s overwhelming at the thought of buying the right diaper cream for your cloth diapers. Not only that but the right kind for your baby’s bottom. Did this article help walk you through what kind of diaper rash cream to use? Feel free to do your own research.

Test some creams out, and let us know your thoughts!

Diaper Rash Cream For Cloth Diapers Index All Youll Ever Need To Know

My Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer and Shield

Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer

Let me say, I am a firm believer that the diaper sprayer is the best thing since sliced bread! Okay, well maybe that is a bit of an exaggeration. However, today as I was spraying a particularly dirty diaper, I was struck, luckily not literally, by how much I appreciate this small little invention called the diaper sprayer! It is quite a convenience to have a terribly soiled diaper which can be easily cleaned with a handful of squirts with my diaper sprayer.

Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer 3

In a hurry? No time to read all about the different diaper sprayers and shields? It’s ok! You can just skip right to the combination I personally use the Aquaus SprayMate & Aquaus 360 Premium Diaper Sprayer for Toilet Bundle Combonation found on Amazon.

A diaper sprayer is used in initially cleaning out and rinsing soiled and dirty clothes or reusable cloth diapers. There are several disposable diapers available in the market, however, a large number of parents still prefer conventional reusable cloth or cotton. I think most prefer cloth diapers not only to save on costs but also to help reduce wastes that are being thrown in the environment.

 

What Do You Do With The Poop?

One of the first questions I am asked whenever someone finds out that we’ve cloth diapered our children, is “What do you do with the poop?”

Pee diapers are the easy ones, you just take those off and throw them in your pail. Done. The poop diapers have a couple of different approaches. If your baby is exclusively breastfed, you do not need to do anything special with these diapers–just throw them right into your pail along with the rest of them!

As you start solids, you’ll want to make sure that the diaper is free of solid poops. You can usually just shake it over your toilet and be done with it–sometimes stubborn poops require a bit of a dunking. You can either spray these off with a diaper sprayer, which easily attaches to your toilet, or by “dunking and swishing” them in clean toilet water. I’ve tried both methods and I can tell you I prefer my sprayer!

Another option is to use diaper liners on top of the cloth inside of the diaper. A diaper liner is flushable and keeps the poops separated from your cloth and makes clean up even easier!

Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer 5 Poop

The 411 On The Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer

There’s no clear record on how these specific sprayers came into existence. But just like any other equipment or household items, they were created by necessity. The sprayer makes cleaning diapers way faster, easier, and more hygienic. Diaper sprayers are just like the sprayers used in the kitchen, in laundry areas, or the pressurized washers for cars. The cloth diapers toilet sprayer creates pressurized water sprinkle to remove all solid surface dirt from the diaper before it is taken to the washing machine.

The sprayer is usually installed in the toilet to provide easy access in flushing the waste or dirt directly to the toilet. The sprayer resembles some kinds of toilet bidet. It has nozzles for control, and the tube is flexible similar to a rubber hose. The tube can either be made out of metal, rubber or perhaps, flexible plastic.

Among the benefits or uses of the diaper sprayer include:

  • A better and hygienic way of disposing of your babies’ regular diaper waste.
  • Cleaning out diapers even without touching or messing up the “poop.”
  • The pressurized nozzles help conserve water instead of using running or flowing water from the faucet.
  • It minimizes risks of spreading that stinky odor in another batch of clothes for washing.
  • And that the sprayer can also be used for other personal washing purposes in the bathroom.

 

How Does A Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer Work?

Before I purchased my cloth diapers toilet sprayer I would swish my diapers in the toilet to remove soiling from the diapers. I do not know about you but it felt like an incredibly ineffective and messy method for removing soiling. I just kept thing “There has to be an easier way than this!!” Besides the fact that not much soiling would actually come off the diaper that I was furiously swishing, the idea of sticking my hand into the toilet with a soiled diaper just didn’t appeal to me…call me crazy.

For those of you who have never used a diaper sprayer, or maybe never even seen one, I will give you a quick description. A diaper sprayer is very similar to the sprayer that is present in kitchen sinks. Like the kitchen sprayer, diaper sprayers hook into the house’s water line. In the case of the diaper sprayer, it is the line which goes to the toilet. The diaper sprayer draws water directly from the house’s water line, not from the toilet bowl. The diaper sprayer basically consists of a hose to carry the water and a hand-held sprayer. On my diaper sprayer, there is a small lever, where the diaper sprayer connects to the waterline, which controls the amount of water that comes through the sprayer. There is also a small button on the hand-held sprayer which is held down to actually spray the water. In addition, there is a small hook that can be placed above the toilet to store the sprayer when it is not in use.

How To Clean A Poopy Diaper Without A Diaper Sprayer

To clean a poopy diaper without a diaper sprayer you would “Dunk & Swish.” Simply put, you would place the poopy diaper in the toilet, dunk it a few times, swish it around, flush and dunk again. You repeat this method until all fecal matter is washed from the diaper.

Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer Dunk Swish

Popular Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer Brands

There are only a few companies that specialize in this aspect of babywear and diaper care. Among the well-known brands available in the market today include the following.

BumGenius Diaper Sprayer.  BumGenius is one of the global brands specializing in the development and production of sanitary products for babies. Its line of baby care products include the numerous styles and designs of the best cloth diapers, flannel wipes, bottom cleaners, odor remover, insert sock, stay dry doublers, paid liner, traveler wet-bag, diaper detergent, and the diaper type of sprayer. All of which are carefully designed to fit the sensitive sanitary requirements of all babies.

The Aquaus Mini Shower Diaper Sprayer. Another popular brand available in the market is the Mini Aquaus sprayer. It has that classic stainless steel metal look, flexible stainless steel hoses, and unique nozzles that produces shower like water sprinkles.

Aquaus 360 Premium Diaper Sprayer. Aquaus SprayMate is another brand that specializes in baby care. Aside from cloth diapers, the brand is also producing other baby care essentials and accessories like the diaper pail, wipes, tote bags, changing pads, nursing pads, and diaper cleaning aids like detergents and sprayers. The company also offers these products in kits or perhaps, in bundles.

Tips in Choosing the Best Diaper Sprayer

When confused about choosing or shopping for the right sprayer you need, the following simple tips should be of help.

  • Go for the popular brand. Because the top brands already have succeeded in providing and satisfying the needs of most consumers. These are usually the brands that have been tried and tested.
  • Choose a water-saving sprayer; high on the pressure but low in actual water output.
  • Choose stainless steel or durable rubber for the hose. This prevents rusting for the steel and early damage or cracks for the rubber hose.
  • Choose a sprayer that is fit for your home’s kind of plumbing.
  • And always try to look for a good deal in terms of the price and freebies.

With a diaper sprayer, you will never have to manually face the burden of manually handling your precious little child’s waste again.

Let’s Talk About Brown Mist

 

Why You Need A Sprayer Shield!

 

Cloth diapering doesn’t have to be hard – spend those extra minutes reading or relaxing rather than scrubbing brown-mist (aka poop) off your walls!

 

Diaper sprayers can spray poo water containing intestinal bacteria like staphylococcus, salmonella, Shigellosis, klebsiella, and e.coli.

 

It’s known to as the “aerosol” effect and has been verified by multiple microbiology studies. Television shows like “Mythbusters” and “Curiosity” even had their ten minutes of poo fame.

 

The Sprayer shield wraps around your high-powered sprayer, not your cloth diaper. It becomes a protective funnel that allows you to clean your dirty cloth diapers without spraying the poo all over the bathroom.

Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer Messy Splatter

Popular Cloth Diapers Toilet Sprayer Shield Brands

There are very few name brand companies that carry cloth diaper toilet sprayer shields and even fewer that I would say work exceptionally well. Here are my top picks for the ones you can trust to stand behind their products.

Spray Pal. The Spray Pal was invented by a cloth diapering mom and dad who were tired of cleaning up the mess caused by the diaper sprayer.

Diaper Dawgs Spray Collar. The Diaper Dawg Spray Collar fits in the palm of your hand and requires no reassembly.Warning poo pics!

Aquaus SprayMate.

 

Tips in Choosing the Best Diaper Sprayer Shield

When choosing a sprayer shield, we suggest the following.

  • Go for the popular brand; Again popular brands have been in business longer, have a reputation and stand behind their products.
  • Choose one that you’ll be comfortable using; watch the three videos I’ve provided. Seeing is believing and once you’ve watched all three of the diaper shield videos hopefully you can pick the one you think will fit your lifestyle and comfort zone.

With a diaper sprayer shield, you will never have to worry about spraying poo all over your bathroom!

Washing Cloth Diapers in Hard Water – Yarna Saved My CD Stash

Washing Cloth Diapers In Hard Water

Washing Cloth Diapers in Hard Water – Yarna Saved My CD Stash

You may be wondering how to clean cloth diapers when you have hard water at your house? Hard water has a high mineral content, which can make it challenging to get your diapers clean. Washing cloth diapers in hard water is a real challenge to a lot of cloth diapering parents. If this is you, you have found the best resource for understanding exactly what hard water is, how it affects you, and what to do about it. So let’s get started.

In a hurry?
If you’d like to skip all of the hard water techie stuff, you can jump right into viewing the YARNA Whole House Electronic Water Softener & Descaler – Available Here on Amazon. It’s not an exageration to say it saved my cloth diaper stash and my famlies clothes! This thing is so easy to install and much cheaper than what I was spending on Calgon or adding salts to my old whole house softener!

What Is Hard Water?

Given that over 60% of this earth’s water supply is groundwater that moves through stone and soil, picking up minerals, among them magnesium and calcium, as they go along. Calcium is also a naturally occurring situation of the underground water supply. Hard water is caused by a build-up of magnesium and calcium that water picks up through sediment and stone before entering the home.

Hard water is simply a measure of the calcium and magnesium in your water. Commonly, hardness can be measured in milligrams per liter, grains per gallon or parts per million. As a result of the dissolved calcium, it generally, although not always, has a pH greater than 7 (neutral).

Is Hard Water Harmful?

Hard water is fine for many applications about a residence, including sprinkling a backyard, cleaning automobiles and general outdoors garden care. Hard water isn’t a difficulty for overall health.

Calcium in the water can be helpful for human beings, vegetation, and animals. It does, however, create issues with the build-up of magnesium and calcium inside water system pipes and appliances such as hot water heaters. Damage to these pipes and appliances cost people all-around the earth hundreds of millions of dollars year after year! Quite a few of your difficulties created by hard water are hidden until some malfunction happens in your home’s plumbing system or water-using appliances.

Water Heater Scale

Where Does Hard Water Come From?

Hard water is a problem for many people, especially cloth diapering parents! Hard water is any water that is made up of a considerable amount of dissolved calcium.

Magnesium and calcium are collected within a natural water system as it passes through earth and rock. Calcium is an everyday and naturally occurring reality of underground water sources.

Hard water doesn’t pose a health threat, nor is it regulated by any government or state agencies. The hardness of water can often be confused with alkalinity because both of them are reported in the same units (mg/l CaCO3).

Running Ground Water

What Are The Issues With Hard Water

Hard water creates lots of problems around the home, and some affect you personally, such as your precious cloth diapers! The most harm is to your home appliances, water heating, and water lines. In all cases, the damage is expensive to manage and repair. You know as well as I do that a good cloth diaper stash, even a modest one, is an investment you don’t want to take a chance with!

Common problems will arrise with hard water and can range from nuisances such as “hard water hair” to costly appliance repairs. Hard water causes scaling; where minerals forms a hard deposit known as lime.

The main problems linked to hard water are the mineral deposits which they leave behind on your cloth diapers, other laundry, and within your appliances. Particularly when your appliance handles a lot of water, the limescale can build up. Apart from being unsightly anywhere, it accumulates, this particular scale can block pipes or cut short the life of flushing toilets and water heating systems. The plumbing and water heating systems often clog up so badly, they have to be replaced. Expensive system repairs from a plumber will likely then become inevitable

One other issue is related to how hard water responds to soap and the residue that it leaves. That is why cloth diapers that are laundered in hard water don’t get clean and feel rigid and scratchy immediately after laundering. Hard water deposits are also why your cloth diapers stop absorbing and begin smelling nasty!

Another unwanted effect of hard water is that in some cases, it worsens existing skin complaints. What’s more, where the water is especially challenging, or the people using it (such as your baby) are especially prone to this, hard water can cause things including skin rashes, psoriasis, and eczema.

The scale deposited by hard water is also known to increase energy expenses by as much as 25%.

Increased Energy Bills

Hard Water Decreases the Life Span of Appliances, Laundry, and Cloth Diapers
Hard water decreases the lifespan and performance of appliances, increases electricity intake, results in dull cloth diaper laundry and crockery and utensils and damages skin and hair. Once heated up, dissolved hard-water minerals re-crystallize and make scale which eventually clogs up the pipes, bringing down water movement through pipes. These metals interact with the substances making your water pipes and appliances and eats into them. The minerals tend to form deposits on the surfaces of water heating elements, baths, and inside hot water plumbing.

Hard Water Increases Your Energy Costs
This leads to greater power costs for heaters and pricey repairs for coffee machines, cooling systems, heat components, solar collectors, water heating elements, etc. and it also encourages bacterial growth. Hard water even considerably decreases the functional life of your water pipes, household appliances (dishwasher, washing machine, A/C unit, etc.), along with any plumbing-related fittings throughout your home.

The scale is highly insoluble and is hard to clear away after built up, usually contributing to expensive removal efforts. Water heaters, humidifiers, boilers, and domestic water lines come to be lined with an increasingly thick covering of calcium and magnesium scale. Utilizing hard water could also raise the expense of home-based water heating by approximately fifteen to twenty percent.

Hard water scale inside a water heater creates an insulating layer that stops the burners or heating components from heating up water economically. Only 1/8″ of scale in the water heating tank may demand as much as 30% extra fuel to heat up the water to the required heat level.

Hard Water Hot Water Heater Scale

How Do You Know If You Have Hard Water?

 

When you use cleaning soap or detergent products, it has poorer efficiency in comparison to soft water – it produces much less lather. Hard water definitely hikes soap utilization plus the quantity of “soap scum” formed on dishes.

You can find out if the water is too hard before it comes to clearing up major accumulation. Hard water is normally taken to suggest water containing minerals over 121 mg/L, micrograms per liter of H2O, or above 7 grains of hardness in each gallon.

The easiest way to tell is to agitate some soap in a sink full of water. If it does not lather up really easily, you probably have hard water. Soap will make lots of bubbles in soft water.

A few other tell-tell signs of hard water are dingy looking clothes, clothes that feel hard or scratchy, the film left on a glass shower door or walls, water spots left on clean dishes, and dull-looking hair. You can also test the water to see just how hard it is.

How To Wash Cloth Diapers In Hard Water 2

Water Testing

The majority of us that think about water testing and the water quality in our area are more concerned about the fact that we drink the water than any other reason.  The fact of the matter is, however, there are a variety of different reasons why people use water, and it may be necessary for them to test the water regularly in order to make sure that there are not any problems.

Who Needs to Test Water?

Of all of the different people who test their water regularly, it is individuals that live on a well-system that tend to be the most cautious.  Wellwater testing is extremely important, not just for the sake of your cloth diapers but particularly because you are sharing water with an underground table that is vulnerable to a number of different environmental issues.  It might not even be in your specific area where these problems occur, yet the only way for you to know whether you are affected directly is through well water testing.  That is why it is important for you to make sure that you schedule these tests to be done on a regular basis.

Testing Your Water With Test Strips

If home testing strips is the route you want to go, I recommend the ON4HOME Home Testing Kit, which you can find HERE on Amazon.

 

Testing Your Water With Castile Soap

If you’d prefer to use Dr. Bronner’s Pure-Castile Soap method, you can also pick it up on Amazon HERE.

 

I’ve Been Washing Cloth Diapers in Hard Water! Now What?

The problem with washing diapers in hard water is that the minerals in the water make it difficult to get all the detergent rinsed out, which can lead to buildup issues, stinky diapers, and diapers that don’t work very well. And, hard water just does not get things as clean as soft water, so your diapers may not be getting as clean as they could, leaving them looking dingy.

Washing Cloth Diapers in Hard Water Here’s How

 

  • Add a small amount, 1/2 a cup or so, of vinegar to the rinse cycle. This has helped many people with hard water issues. Use caution, however. Sometimes adding vinegar to hard water actually makes the situation worse! It just really depends on the mineral makeup of your water. If you notice your diapers getting really stinky, stop using vinegar and see if the stink goes away.
  • Use a water softener in the rinse cycle of your wash. Calgon and other water softeners can be found in the laundry aisle at the supermarket.
  • You can purchase a water softening tank that you attach to your water supply. This is an expensive option but will be noticed throughout your household, from cleaner dishes to shinier hair.
  • Try using a little more detergent in your wash. Experiment. Sometimes you just need a little more soap to get things clean with hard water.
  • If you do have hard water, you will probably have to strip your diapers more often than those lucky moms with soft water.

The name of the game here, as always, is to experiment! How to clean cloth diapers with hard water depends on many factors, and it may take a little bit to figure out what works best in your household.

So let’s break these down.

When Washing Cloth Diapers in Hard Water Try:

1. Vinegar

White vinegar is not highly acidic, but it can be used to remove some stains and break up hard water when doing the laundry. White vinegar helps get out detergent residues, restore the pH balance, whiten whites, and soften the diapers when added to the wash/rinse in the fabric softener dispenser or Downy Ball.

2. Liquid Water Softener

Calgon is a liquid water softener that you add to your wash load. It comes in a rather small bottle. We tried this method and used 2 bottles every week. At $5+ per bottle, we decided to find a better solution.

3. Water Softening Tank

Water softeners are usually total home water treating systems, employed to reduce water hardness and are also regarded as the 1st step for improving the quality of water used in your household. Water softeners are traditionally used to improve hard water, which carries dissolved calcium and even magnesium, making your cloth diapers stiff, smelly and sometimes discolored.

Water Softening Tanks are a hassle to maintain! We were constantly adding salts! We eventually removed ours!

4. Install An Electrical Water Softening Device

YARNA Whole House Electronic Water Softener & Descaler – Available on Amazon

5. Detergent

Use more detergent than the manufacturer recommends. I mean really lay it on! This method only works if your water is slightly hard. Using the right laundry detergent for your cloth diapers helps also.

6. Stripping Your Cloth Diapers

We have an excellent article on stripping your cloth diapers.

F.Y.I.

 

Precipitating water softeners

Precipitating water filters work by putting a solution into a large amount of water, such as a washing machine or a dishwasher.  When you run the machine, the solution mixes with the water, and the minerals create non-soluble particles that have the Calcium and Magnesium ions in it. After things have been washed with these separated particles, they have to be washed to get the particles off. This keeps the particles from hurting the clothes and dishes. The bad side is that the particles make the water cloudy; they can cling to the fabric of clothes. If this happens, the deposit can make the fabric harsh, and it can also change certain dyes.

Non-precipitating water softeners

Non-precipitating water softeners are also solutions that you put into the water. These break up the minerals in the water and keep them from depositing on the clothes, dishes, or whatever is in the water. Because this type of water softener holds the minerals, there is no need to rinse things after they have been washed to get particles off of them. Non-precipitating water softeners have fewer disadvantages to them than precipitating water softeners, and they can even deal with the problems that precipitating water softeners create. They are able to restore colors and fabrics to their original state by taking the Ca and Mg from them, and the water stays clear.

 

Sources:

Precipitating and Non-precipitating Water Softeners. http://www.angelfire.com/amiga2/linde4723/precip.html

Ecowater Systems – News. http://ecowatersystemsla.weebly.com/news.html

 

 

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Cloth Diaper Washing Instructions ~ That Work!

Cloth Diaper Washing Instructions

I’m standing here in my laundry room and started thinking, “Why are there so many confusing cloth diaper wash instructions online? and what’s the simplest routine for washing cloth diapers in any washing machine?” I personally have tried all sorts of cloth diaper wash routines that other well-meaning folks have recommended. However, they all seemed more like “work” and “learning a whole new thing!” I wanted a wash routine that would fit my busy schedule! I wanted a wash routine that wouldn’t require me to have post-it notes pasted all over my laundry room wall!

 

Cloth Diaper Washing Instructions that work in (nearly ) any machine!

 

  • Pre-wash: COLDWATER, NO DETERGENT
    Empty diaper pail into the washer and use the pre-wash (also called rinse & spin or quick wash) cycle to rinse out the urine and any remaining fecal matter.
  • Main wash: REGULAR CYCLE WITH EXTRA RINSE, HOT WASH, AND MEDIUM WATER LEVEL
    1. Add ½ of a cup baking soda, 1/3 detergent, and one tablespoon of Oxyclean (this can be purchased in bulk at Sam’s or at your local discount store).
    2. Add 1 cup vinegar to balance the pH level
    3. I let my diapers sit overnight to allow the pH to balance than the first thing I put the lid down on the washer and my diapers are done!
  • Dry: Dry diapers in the dryer. DO NOT USE ANY SOFTNER (it will coat the diapers and make them less absorbent). Or you can hang them in the sun to dry, put them in the dryer for a few minutes to soften them up. The sun makes an excellent stain remover! Air-dry your covers. They will last much longer
  • Done!!!

In the rest of the article, I’ll give you some extra tips that have helped me through the years such as; how often to wash, what to do with poopy cloth diapers, my thoughts on cloth diaper sprayers and the dunk and swish, what to do about formula-fed poop stained cloth diapers and finally how to clean poopy cloth diapers without sprayer.
 

How To Clean Cloth Diapers With Poop

 
Remove your child’s diaper and dump any solid waste into the toilet. I prefer to rinse my diapers as the bacteria doesn’t smell as bad in the pail after 2 -3 days. I also use a dry pail, which means the diapers are placed in a pail that contains a diaper bag or liner in it. Some people prefer a wet pail, meaning the keep water with some baking soda in the pail. I have used both, and a dry pail works best for me.
 

How Often To Wash Cloth Diapers

 
How often to wash is different for every cloth diaper household! How often you wash your cloth diapers is going to depend on how many you have in your stash and how often your little one is urinating or soiling them. Newborns tend to soil diapers frequently while older babies tend to urine in larger quantity.
 

Getting Rid of The Poop Using The Dunk & Swish

 
The dunk and swish method of cleaning poop off of cloth diapers is exactly what it sounds like. You Dunk the diaper into the toilet, Swish it around, Dunk again, Swish..repeat until the solids are no longer stuck to the diaper. For those who can not afford a diaper sprayer, this method works to an extent, but the poop residue is never as clean as compared to spraying with a diaper sprayer. However, anything left on the diaper will come out in Step ONE of my wash instructions, from above (Pre-wash: COLDWATER, NO DETERGENT). That’s the sole purpose of this step, to rinse away any leftover urine or poop residue!
 

My Thoughts On Cloth Diaper Sprayers

 
I absolutely LOVE my cloth diaper sprayer. Anyone who has been reading my blog for any length of time may remember the article I wrote comparing it to slice bread! (How Does A Diaper Sprayer Work)  A diaper sprayer is one of those things that you don’t realize how much they make your life easier until you finally get one! You simply hold the diaper at an angle (as to not get backspray in your face!) and the spray! It’s like a garden hose sprayer or dish sprayer attached to your toilet water supply!
 

What To Do About Formula-Fed Poop-Stained Diapers?

 
If you have introduced formula or solid foods, then you need to start spraying the poop off or dumping it into your toilet. All you need is a diaper sprayer, which you’re going to need eventually anyway once your baby begins solid foods to spray that poop off into the toilet. A diaper sprayer just looks like the sprayer attachment that’s on your kitchen sink. You don’t have to use one of those, you can just dump the poop, or you can take the diaper and drop it into the toilet and sort of swish it around to get the poop off.
 

What To Do With Breast-Fed Poop-Stained Diapers?

 
If you are exclusively breastfeeding, then you can take that diaper with the poop on it directly from your baby to your washing machine. That’s right; you can stick the diaper with the poop on it right in the wash. The reason why is because it is water soluble so that poop will completely dissolve in the wash with the water. It will come out clean it. However, if you have introduced formula or solid foods, then you need to start spraying the poop off or dumping it into your toilet.
 

What Is The Best Diaper Sprayer For Cloth Diapers?

 
The highest rated diaper sprayer for cloth diapers is the “SmarterFresh Cloth Diaper Sprayer.” This unit gets rave reviews on Amazon! The kit comes with everything you need to complete their famous “10-minute install) – Thier words, not mine. I’m technically challenged and have to admit; it took me about 18-20 minutes to install mine. Then again, I did it without any help from hubby. Two-Points for Mom!
 

What Is The Cheapest Diaper Sprayer For Cloth Diapers?

 
I actually found two diaper sprayers that are considerably cheap! The “2 in 1 Cloth Diaper Sprayer and Handheld Bidet Sprayer” which says that it “includes wall mount to keep sprayer up high from toddlers when not in use” and “styles vary and may not include T-valve.”  So if you’re looking for super cheap, this is proabably what you’re looking for. Keep in mind though that you may need to purchase as T-valve.

The next cheapest diaper sprayer I could find was the “AWESON Quality ABS Cloth Diaper Sprayer“. This sprayer is actually a kit, so no need to purchase anything extra. I personally am NOT impressed with this unit! The reviews are horrible!
 

Cloth Diaper Washing Instructions To Clean Poopy Diapers Without A Diaper Sprayer

 
Disposable Liners: You can also purchase diaper liners. Disposable diaper liners can be taken off the diaper after your baby has soiled it and be thrown directly into the trash. For those on public sewage and not a septic tank, the best place is to put all the poop into our toilet regardless of whether we’re using disposable diapers, cloth diapers or disposable liners. You really want that poop to be going down the toilet and not into our landfills! Disposable liners can range from $5 and up. You can see the $5 range here or the $15 range here.

Make Your Own: You can also just use strips of fabric in your diaper, and then you can remove those strips of fabric after they soil their diaper. Old T-Shirts, any old fabric really… cut them into strips and instant cloth diaper liners. I wouldn’t want to do this full time while cloth diapering, but the do-it-yourself method of cutting worn-out clothing will do in a pinch when you are in between paydays and out of purchased liners.

Do It Yourself Cloth Diaper Liners 225x300

Reusable Liners: There are also Reusable cloth diaper liners, which to me defeats the whole “just throw away the poop” thing, but then again reusable liners are more cost-effective, will put less waste in the landfills and is more cost-effective. So I guess if you’re looking at diaper liners the question is Do I want super easy throwaway, or do I want to make my dollar stretch as far as it can. See them here and here.
 

Caring for your cloth diapers and cloth diaper covers

 
Should you use soap or detergent to wash your diapers? Soap is made from natural ingredients, while detergent is a cleaning product without natural soap, which means that detergents contain at least some synthetics. If your goal is to be as gentle as possible on the environment, choose soap.

Some will recommend that you not use soap to wash cloth diapers because of the reaction with hard water that can leave a residue. The natural solution is simple: a vinegar rinse will break down the residue, so your diapers maintain absorbency.

If you do choose a detergent, be sure to look for detergent made from renewable resources rather than petrochemicals. You can also find many detergents made with natural fragrances and no dyes.
 

Washing Diaper Covers

 
Most diaper covers do not need to be washed after every use, but be sure to wash Haute Pockets or Pocket Cloth Diapers every time they are used since the cover is next to baby’s skin. Soiled polyester covers can be placed in a laundry pail until wash time then washed with the diapers. Do not place wool covers in the pail.

Wash wool covers separately in lukewarm water with a wool wash. Do not use regular soaps or detergents for wool, which is a protein fiber and needs different care. If you do not have wool wash on hand, use a small amount of gentle shampoo and 100% liquid lanolin.
 

Our Washing Method

 

  • Use a dry pail. No soaking! Shake the excess feces into the toilet before putting diaper into a pail. Add a drop or two of lemon essential oil to a cotton ball and wipe the inside of the diaper pail to control odor and for its nice citrus scent. Better yet, use the recipe below to make your own spray!
  • Never use fabric softeners. These degrade the fibers and affect absorbency.
  • A single load should have no more than 24 diapers.
  • Hang Bummis, Wonderoos, and Fuzzi Bunz to dry to increase their lifespan.
  • Dry fleece covers with diapers, wipes, and inserts on high heat.
  • High heat or direct sunlight will sterilize cloth diapers.

If you care for cloth diapers by cleaning and rinsing well then drying with high heat, you will not only give them a long absorbent life, but you will avoid bacteria and irritants that can cause diaper rash. With a little experience, you will soon be the expert on how to wash cloth diapers.
 

DIY Deodorizing Diaper Pail Spray

 

  1. In a 4 oz. spray bottle, combine tea tree essential oil and lemon essential oil.
  2. Measure in 1 oz. of witch hazel.
  3. Add 2 oz. Distilled Water
  4. Cap and shake.
  5. Spray down Diaper Pail and Inside of Lid, Allow To dry completely before using.

 

PLEASE NOTE:

  • DO NOT USE REGULAR BLEACH.** USE BORAX SPARINGLY – Harsh products will wear out the cotton fibers very quickly.
  • DO NOT ADD FABRIC SOFTENER – It will decrease the absorbency of the diapers by coating the cotton fibers.
  • SUN GETS STAINS OUT AND STERILIZES DIAPERS! You can also sprinkle some lemon juice on a stain to remove it.
  • A SECOND RINSE is recommended to get rid of any leftover detergent, especially for babies with sensitive skin or that are prone to diaper rash.
  • A HOT MAIN WASH WILL GET RID OF BACTERIA and will not contaminate your washing machine.

** Using bleach will wear out your cloth diaper fibers, however, I have used a capful or two on occasion when I have had a really nasty diaper rash and again when the flu was running rampant through the home. It can be used… but not as a rule of thumb!

 

 

 

 

Stripping Cloth Diapers – How To STRIP Deep Clean Your Cloth Diapers

Stripping Cloth Diapers Here Is How To Do It

First and foremost, if your cloth diaper is under warranty before you attempt this or any other cloth diaper cleaning routine, please consult the manufacturer as you could void your warranty if they have specific stripping instructions.

Buildup. It’s an ugly word in the cloth diapering community. And if you have any experience with cloth diapers you know why. Leakage, stink, stains, are all par for the course when you have detergent build-up on your diapers. Now here is the million-dollar question; how do I keep my diapers clean and build-up free? Well first off, always make sure that your washing routine is a good one!

A typical washing routine is as follows: A cold pre-rinse to get rid of all of the yuck. A hot wash with cloth diaper recommended detergent. An additional cold rinse. (a total of two final rinses). The type of cloth diapers you own will determine the kind of detergent you use.

It is always important to use the recommended detergent for your diapers. Not only because it will help them last longer, but it will also allow you to send the diaper back to the manufacturer in case of a faulty elastic, bad snap, or any other manufacturer defect due to normal wear. When you purchase new diapers from an authorized retailer, most cloth diaper companies will repair your diapers for free with proof of purchase.

With that said, the following instructions for stripping cloth diapers are intended for those diapers that are not under warranty.
 
Blue Dawn Cloth Diaper
 

Stop Over Complicating it!!

 
Here I go again, keeping it real! Blue Dawn is all the rave among Cloth Diaper Mommas’. While yes I’ll admit it has it’s own merits; you do not “have” to use Blue Dawn.

Honestly, I find it ridiculous when I read someone post… “You HAVE to strip your cloth diapers with Blue Dawn!”

Also, you know what I hate hearing? The term “stripping cloth diapers.” It puts thought of paint stripping in my head. It sounds like some harsh act. It also confuses a lot of new cloth diaper mommas! They think “Of great! Something else to learn”.
 

Stripping Is Just Another Way of Saying Deep Clean!

 
I’m here to tell you straight up (as a cloth diaper momma of many years!)  Blue Dawn hysteria is bullshit!

Blue Dawn is fantastic for cutting grease, so if you need to remove greasy diaper rash creams and such, then yes you can use blue dawn, but you don’t have to!

Stripping” is just a newfangled way of saying “deep cleaning.” If you want to deep clean your diapers, wash them with a good cloth diaper detergent (like Tide or Foca). I mean really lay it on and use a proper amount of detergent and add some oxygen bleach for the rinse cycle. Your diapers will get really clean, then just do another full wash with no detergent for a really good rinse. Bam, deep cleaned diapers! No confusing terms.. just deep clean them!

Although I don’t really like the term “stripping cloth diapers“, it is a well known and a widely used term so I will continue to use it in this post for reference and clarity sake. One less thing to be confused about!
 

Other Than Deep Cleaning What Else Can You Do?

 
These are general instructions only.

Stripping cloth diapers is something most cloth diapering mommas will have to do from time to time. There are many reasons why you would need to do this. Such as when….

  • cloth diapers that have developed bad smells
  • cloth diapers you have bought second hand
  • cloth diapers that are suddenly leaking

It’s not something you will need to do very often. And with the careful care of your cloth diapers, some people never need to strip wash ever!

Following our washing instructions and using a good detergent like Rock’n’Green can help you not need to strip your cloth diapers.

The most common culprit for stinky cloth diapers is detergent buildup. This buildup will cause stinkiness, water repelling and diaper rash. Using too much detergent can make it difficult to get your diapers fully rinsed out. What happens, wash after wash, is a nice little build up forms on the diapers. You really only need to use about 1/4 to 1/2 of what the manufacturers recommend.

Another culprit that may have you needing to strip your diapers is using the wrong kind of detergent. Many natural detergents have oils in them that will build up on your diapers. Also, detergents with fragrance, brighteners, etc. will leave stuff on your diapers, which you don’t want.

Diaper rash creams
, especially those with zinc oxide are very difficult to get out of cloth diapers and can cause water to repel. Also, diaper rash creams that have fish oil in them can make your diapers stink like fish… Ewww!! A definite good reason for stripping cloth diapers!

 

When To Strip (Deep Clean)

 

  1. Sometimes, your cloth diapers may need a strip wash as the build up in the soakers and shell fabrics can cause cloth diapers to become quite smelly immediately after being wee’d in. They will smell lovely and fresh post-wash, but after urine contact, they smell very strong and you can smell them from a distance.
  2. Secondhand cloth diapers may also do better with a strip wash if you have bought them from someone unknown. As not everyone looks after their cloth diapers as well as you will. Some use detergents that build up, some may simply not have stripped their cloth diapers ever.
  3. Also, a sign that cloth diapers may need stripping, is if a cloth diaper that was previously fine, suddenly starts to lose absorbency and leak. This can be a sign of build up and stripping them back will remove that build up and restore them back to how they were.

 

Limit Stripping Cloth Diapers

 
Strip washing should only ever be done a maximum of twice a year, really, as each time you do this it reduces the life of your cloth diapers slightly.
 

So, when is it time to strip your diapers?

 

  • If they are really stinky, even after washing.
  • If they are repelling instead of absorbing water (this happens a lot with pocket diapers when they get detergent buildup).
  • After using diaper cream with zinc oxide, oils, or waxes.
  • If your diapers start to leak and not absorb as well as they used to.

Just like all things cloth diaper related, stripping cloth diapers varies from family to family. Everyone’s washing machine and water quality vary. You may find you need to experiment to find what works best for you. How do you know it worked?? Your diapers will be clean, odor free and working great! Trust your nose. If your diapers smell stinky, they are not clean.
 

To Soak or Not Soak

 

There are two methods of stripping cloth diapers. One is a soak method and one isn’t.

I recommend the soak method particularly if you have a front loader.
 

Soak Stripping Cloth Diapers

 

  1. Put your cloth diapers through a normal wash cycle
  2. Add 4 tablespoons of Rock’n’Green to your machine
  3. Set the machine to a hot wash cycle, allow the machine to fill and then press pause
    If you are nervous of shells and hot water, you can wait for the water to cool slightly before putting them in or reduce the temperature to 60 degrees to protect the integrity of the pul and the elastics.
  4. You can leave the soaking cloth diapers for as long as needed: 2-3 hours for smelly, overnight for extra smelly and 24 hours for extra smelly
  5. Resume the cycle
  6. Double rinse the cloth diapers and if you wish, you can add Canesten to the final rinse cycle
  7. Dry the cloth diapers in the sun

** If your cloth diapers are still smelly after this method, you can repeat this with Rock’n’Green’s Funk Rock which is designed for stinkies.

 

No-Soak Strip (aka the Dish Washing Liquid Method)

 

Here are some basic instructions for stripping your diapers, which can be adjusted to better suit your personal laundry needs.

Step 1Start with clean diapers. Wash and rinse like you normally would. You don’t need to dry them since they are just going to get wet again.

Step 2: Wash your diapers in super hot water without detergent, just hot water. You may want to turn the water heater up to do this. Make sure to read the manufactures instructions for your diapers before doing this step. Some diapers shouldn’t be washed in very hot water.Stripping Your Cloth Diapers

Step 3: Rinse your diapers again, in a hot cycle if you can. Peak into the washer during the rinse to see if there are any bubbles in the water. Repeat this step as many times as you need to until there are no more bubbles in the water. No bubbles mean there is no more soap buildup on your dipes, which is what you’re after! This can take 4 or more rinse cycles, so don’t be surprised if you have to rinse over and over again.

Step 4: Dry your diapers. Even better, dry them out in the sun. Sunshine is great at getting rid of stains and killing germs.

 

Additional Tips for Stripping Cloth Diapers

 

Original Dawn Dish Detergent

 
Dawn Add a few drops of Original Dawn Dish Detergent to Step 2 above. This can help get rid of any oils that may be on the diapers. Note: if your washing machine is still under warranty, some washing machine manufacturers will tell you that using Dawn in the washing machine will void their warranty, so check this out before using this trick.
 
 
 

Baking Soda

 
Bakingsoda2 Add 1/2 to 1 cup of baking soda to Step 2. This can help eliminate odors that have built up on your diapers.
 
 
 

White Vinegar

 
Vinegar Add about 1/2 to 1 cup of white vinegar to the rinse cycle of Step 2 above. If you normally use vinegar in the rinse, try not using it. Sometimes vinegar is really helpful, but sometimes it can react negatively with hard water, leaving a stink behind.
 
 
 

Bac-Out by Bi-o-Kleen

 
Bacout2 Bac-Out is a product that can help with stripping cloth diapers. You can find Bac-Out at many natural food stores. Just make sure to rinse the diapers really well, probably several times. Some babies are very sensitive to the ingredients in Bac-Out.
 
 
 

Calgon Water Softener

 
Calgon Try using Calgon Water Softener if you have hard water. Be sure your diapers get rinsed out really well after using.
 
 
 

Oxy-Clean

 
Oxiclean Use Oxy-Clean in Step 2 above and then rinse, rinse, rinse. Oxy-Clean can break down the fibers of your diapers, so I don’t recommend doing this method very often.
 
 
 

RLR

 
RlrstrippingYou may be able to find a product called RLR at your local grocery store. It is a laundry treatment that is not as harsh as bleach and can really do wonders for diapers with a lot of build-up. I have used this on my pocket diapers when they were really leaking and it fixed the problem on the first try. Follow the package instructions and make sure to rinse your diapers really well afterward.
 
 
 

Bleach

 
Bleach Bleach. I know I’ve said not to use chlorine bleach on your cloth diapers. But, sometimes it is the only thing that will get the job done. I would definitely save this as a last resort and make sure to rinse like crazy! And, using bleach will void the warranty for some diapers – it’s a good idea to check with your diaper manufacturer before washing your diapers with bleach.

Yes, chlorine bleach it is great for killing germs, but it is bad for cloth diapers, covers and your family. It will eat away at the fibers in your diapers, leaving holes and frayed edges. It also decreases their durability and absorbency. It may adversely affect the waterproofing in certain cloth diapers. Baking soda and oxygen bleach are great whiteners to use in its place.
 

Additional Effective Options

 
How To Strip Cloth Diapers
 
 

Remember, Chlorine Bleach Options Should Only Be Used AS a Last Resort!

 
FOR ALL OPTION – Rinse 2 or 3 times. If you see suds at the end of the rinse cycle rinse again!

During soak, stirring occasionally to release the mineral build-up from your cloth diapers.

Follow up with a 30-minute bleach soak. Then Wash with your normal detergent plus borax 3-4 times.

PRECAUTION: Keep pets and children away from deep cleaning solutions. Wear gloves and protect your eyes from any slashing.

  • OPTION 1: (Not recommended for iron-rich water) Soak your diapers once in hot water with 1/2 cup of your regular detergent plus add up to a 1/2 cup of bleach for a minimum of 30 minutes but no more than 45 minutes. After the soak, Normal wash and Rinse.
  • OPTION 2: Pour 1 1/2 cups of 3% hydrogen peroxide and 1/2 cup of lemon juice into a gallon jug. Fill the remainder of your jug with distilled water.
    Directions For Use: Use 1 cup of this solution + 1/2 cup of your regular non-toxic laundry detergent in a hot water soak. Optional, add 10-15 drops of Lemon or Thieves essential oils to your liquid washing soap for an added cleaning strength. Soak 4-6 hours. After the soak, Normal Wash, and Rinse.
  • OPTION 3: Fill your bathtub or top loader half full with HOT water, Add 3 Grovia Mighty Bubbles pods plus 1/2 cup of your regular detergent for ONE deep cleaning. Soak 4-6 hours. After the soak, Normal Wash, and Rinse.
  • OPTION 4: DIY mix – Combine 3 Tablespoons of each Washing Soda, Borax, and Calgon for one deep cleaning. Add this DIY mix to your top-loader or bathtub that is half full of HOT water plus 1/2 cup of your regular detergent. Soak 4-6 hours. After the soak, Normal Wash, and Rinse.